Victoria, British Columbia, Phone: 250-744-1731

Why Work? (Part lll)

Why Work? (Part lll)

By Donna Dunning

Donna DunningWhat motivates you to get up and work each day?

The answer to this question can help you position yourself in work that meets your physical and psychological needs.

Psychologists have spent considerable time trying to figure out the meaning of work in people’s lives. In the last two blogs I explored working to make money and working for personal satisfaction. In this post I’ll cover a third reason for working.

Working for social connection

A third basic reason for working is to interact with others. Work provides social connections and opportunities to help others.

I’m not sure social reasons for working are strong drivers for everyone. I think perhaps people who prefer Introversion and Thinking may be drawn more to opportunities to work independently and less to opportunities to build social connections.

Your relationship to people at work

There are several work values that link to social connection. Perhaps you want to belong to a group, serve your community, enjoy socializing, or have a desire to collaborate with or help others.

If so, how is your work satisfying these needs for connection?

You may also find it important to consider the needs of significant people in your life when defining your ideal work. For example, it may be important to fit your work into other family members’ schedules, or your family circumstances may influence the hours or locations where you work.

Is this type related?

In my Ph.D. research, I found those who prefer both E and F (ESFP, ESFJ, ENFP, and ENFJ) had the highest scores on a component of a work values inventory called Working with Others.

The mean scores of the personality type groups with a preference for Extraversion were mostly above the research sample mean score on this component.

The groups with the lowest scores on the Working with Others component were all ITs (INTJ, INTP, ISTJ, and ISTP), who, according to personality type theory, prefer privacy and like to take an objective, impersonal approach to working relationships.

You can read more about career values and type differences in my Ph.D. Dissertation.

What interaction do you need at work?

When identifying your personal reasons for working, assess how people play a role in your work satisfaction.

Do you seek to socialize with, help, lead, or collaborate with others?

Do you like to be around lots of people or do you prefer a select few? Or are you an independent soul who would prefer to work alone whenever possible?

Once you figure that out you can align your work choices to your social needs.

Resources

Looking for a practical resource to help you plan your ideal career? Check out my book, What’s Your Type of Career?: Find Your Perfect Career By Using Your Personality Type

Share
Tags: ,
This entry was posted on Monday, December 16th, 2013 at 7:42 am and is filed under Blog. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

2 Responses to “Why Work? (Part lll)”

  1. Vicki B says:

    “The groups with the lowest scores on the Working with Others component were all ITs (INTJ, INTP, ISTJ, and ISTP), who, according to personality type theory, prefer privacy and like to take an objective, impersonal approach to working relationships.”

    INTJ *nods*.
    We like to work from home if possible.

  2. Sabrina says:

    Another INTJ/P concurs! I love to work in small groups and confer vs. working in a large group of people for extended periods of time. I focus better that way. I am simply not as productive.

Leave a Reply


MBTI, Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, and Introduction to Type are registered trademarks of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator Trust in the United States and other countries.